Top Dog Pawformance

Professional Dog Training and Boarding Services Brisbane Queensland Australia

So, you’ve decided to get a puppy…

Congratulations!

With this blog; we’re going to make sure that you’re totally prepared for your new family member!

Let’s talk about what you’ll need to do and have on hand BEFORE your new puppy arrives in your home. Then, lets go over what to do, to make sure you and your puppy start on the right paw together.

You’ll also find MORE tips and advice in our articles vault, so you can be sure that you’re covered on all of the need to know basics, for surviving AND thriving with your new puppy.


1. Diet & Nutrition

Chances are, your dog came to you from a breeder, puppy store or shelter organization, where they were fed a certain type of food. You can choose to continue feeding your puppy the same brand, or you could switch your puppy to a different type of food.

If your puppy has been eating a raw food diet while with the breeder or puppy store; we’d recommend continuing to feed your new puppy a commercially prepared, raw food diet, as this is one of the healthiest options for dogs.

Some brands we like the most include Naturally Raw, Proudi Patties, Big Dog Barf and Canine Country.

picture of golden retriever puppies eating dog biscuits out of a bowl

2. Crate / Exercise pen training

Did you know that one of the biggest mistakes new puppy owners make, is to give too much freedom to their puppy, way too soon?

Don’t make that mistake!

Crate training your puppy and training your puppy to be fine with being left alone in an exercise pen (puppy play pen) is a great way to be able to control the environment for your new puppy and will not only prevent your puppy from sneaking off to go toilet in and area they’re not supposed to, it will also keep your puppy safe from getting into things that are dangerous for them! Baby gates will also be hugely beneficial to have installed while your puppy is young, especially if you have stairs in your home.

Also, by training your puppy to be comfortable with spending time alone in their crate / exercise pen, you’ll also help them learn independence and self-control, so you’re more likely to end up with a dog who is confident and comfortable while alone, as well as a dog which doesn’t steal or destroy your personal belongings!

picture of a dog in a crate

3. Out of crate / exercise pen = On Lead

Having your new puppy on lead when they’re outside of their crate or exercise pen; will also make sure you have full control of what your puppy can and cannot access.

On top of preventing your puppy from getting into potentially hazardous situations, leashing your new puppy when they’re outside of their crate / exercise pen, pretty much full-time, will really make it easy to supervise your puppy and will keep you on track to helping your puppy learn to be the best companion ever!

picture of a puppy being held by it's owner.

4.  Puppy proof your home before your puppy arrives

Make sure your puppy doesn’t have access to anything potentially dangerous like, electrical cords, or open stair cases which they could fall through. Have a thorough look over your home and the areas you intend on having your puppy spend time with you; move anything that could be swallowed by your puppy or anything which could cause them injury i.e unstable shelving which could fall. If you do have stairs in your home; set up a baby gate to prevent your puppy from potentially falling or injuring their joints by attempting to descend or climb them.

Also take care of the obvious, like keeping rubbish bins out of the way, or put away in a cupboard where they can’t get to them and place house plants up high and out of reach from little puppy mouths. You’ll also want to make sure any cleaners and chemicals are kept securely in your cabinets.

Try to see your house from your puppy’s point of view. Puppy’s are naturally very curious and have a knack for finding something you’ve missed or something they can put in their mouth and play with.

Make sure your puppy doesn’t have access to anything potentially dangerous like, electrical cords, or open stair cases which they could fall through. Have a thorough look over your home and the areas you intend on having your puppy spend time with you; move anything that could be swallowed by your puppy or anything which could cause them injury i.e unstable shelving which could fall. If you do have stairs in your home; set up a baby gate to prevent your puppy from potentially falling or injuring their joints by attempting to descend or climb them.

Also take care of the obvious, like keeping rubbish bins out of the way, or put away in a cupboard where they can’t get to them and place house plants up high and out of reach from little puppy mouths. You’ll also want to make sure any cleaners and chemicals are kept securely in your cabinets.

Try to see your house from your puppy’s point of view. Puppy’s are naturally very curious and have a knack for finding something you’ve missed or something they can put in their mouth and play with.

picture of a puppy resting on a rug.

Now, if you’re one of the lucky ducks who is introducing a new puppy into your household, here’s another tip you can use right away! Even if you’ve already brought your puppy home, or you’re waiting on a litter, look into what typical “personality” traits are seen in the breed you’ve chosen and plan ahead about how you’re going to make sure their exercise, training and social needs will be met.

When you’ve done that, go ahead and find a local trainer, club or groups, where you’ll get the support and constructive feedback you and your puppy will need, in order to live your best lives together.

Above all, remember not to expect too much, too soon from your puppy – they’re learning about the world through what you tell them, so if they’re making mistakes, make sure you take a look at how and what you’re communicating to them.

Want to learn more about how to prepare for your new puppy?

Check out part 2. On “Preparing for a puppy; the new puppy owners guide to surviving AND thriving with your new puppy” Here.